How do I know what type of Echeveria I have?

How do I know what type of Echeveria I have?

How do I know what type of Echeveria I have?

Echeveria can often be recognized by its gorgeous rosette-shaped with striking plump, spoon-like leaves. They usually have pointy tip but the edges of the leaf are smooth. Echeveria are polycarpic plant, meaning they bloom every year.

How can you tell the difference between Echeveria and Sempervivum?

Leaf shape Echeveria have rounded, plump leaves that are so typical of succulents. They often end in a sharp point like a spike. “But Sempervivums are also rounded and spiky!” That's true – the distinction is made by comparing their plumpness. Echeveria are usually noticeably thicker.

Is Echeveria a sedum?

Echeverias belong to the family Crassulaceae, a very large family containing many genera of succulents such as Aeonium, Crassula, Kalanchoe, Sedum or Sempervivum.

Are hens and chicks the same as succulents?

Hens and chicks are members of the Sempervivum group of succulent plants. They are commonly called houseleeks and grow well indoors and out, in cool or hot temperatures. Hens and chicks plants are so called because of the rosette shape and habit of the plant to produce numerous babies.

What is the most common Echeveria?

'Perle Von Nurnberg' is arguably the most popular type of echeveria, distinguished by a solitary rosette of paddle-shaped, pastel leaves with a dusty appearance. In lower light, the leaves are a muted grayish color but turn bright purple and pink in direct sun.

How often should Echeveria be watered?

Generally speaking, count on watering once every week to ten days; however, small variables such as pot size and plant size may influence this schedule. It's best to simply check your soil every few days and water when it is nearly completely dry.

How often should I water my Echeveria?

Generally speaking, count on watering once every week to ten days; however, small variables such as pot size and plant size may influence this schedule. It's best to simply check your soil every few days and water when it is nearly completely dry.

What is the common name for Echeveria?

Echeveria elegans, the Mexican snow ball, Mexican gem or white Mexican rose is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to semi-desert habitats in Mexico.

How big do echeveria get?

The Echeveria succulent plant is slow growing and usually doesn't exceed 12 inches (31 cm.) in height or spread. Native from Texas to Central America, the plants prefer desert conditions, but will tolerate periods of moisture as long as they are allowed to dry out before applying more water.

What is the common name for echeveria?

Echeveria elegans, the Mexican snow ball, Mexican gem or white Mexican rose is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to semi-desert habitats in Mexico.

Why is Echeveria called hens and chicks?

Echeveria is often called “hens and chicks” for the habit of forming small, baby rosettes at the base of the mother plant. The tiny rosettes clustered around the base of the large, rose-formed plant looks a lot like the tiny baby chicks with their protective mother hen.

How tall does Echeveria gigantea hens and chicks get?

Echeveria Gigantea is also commonly known as the ‘Giant Hens And Chicks’. As the plant matures you can expect it to reach up to around cm (18″) tall. When the plant flowers you can expect it to produce red flowers from late fall to early winter

What kind of plant has white hens and chicks?

Echeveria elegans, is as the name suggests, an elegant classic. Also known as White Mexican Rose, Mexican hens and chicks and Mexican Gem. The lovely flower-like rosettes can in time become a virtual carpet of pale blue. It's easy to grow, and forms offsets quickly and can make a wide carpet of the rose-like rosettes.

What does a baby Echeveria plant look like?

The tiny rosettes clustered around the base of the large, rose-formed plant looks a lot like the tiny baby chicks with their protective mother hen. Leaving the baby echeveria, called “pups” in place will yield a full planting of many rosettes like the image above.


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